Export Market Guide - Argentina

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All regulatory information for exporting wine to Argentina, including the regulatory environment, duties and taxes, and permitted additives.

Argentina is located in South America, bordering the South Atlantic Ocean, between Chile and Uruguay. It has a land area of 2,736,690 sq km, and almost 5000 kilometres of coastline. Argentina’s climate is mostly temperate with an arid region in the southeast and subantarctic in the southwest. Argentina is also home to the Andes mountain range which runs along its western border with Chile. Almost 54 per cent of Argentina’s land is used for agriculture, much of which is located in the rich plains of the Pampas in the east of the country.[1]

Argentina is a member of the United Nations, the G20, the World Trade Organisation, the Cairns Group and the Southern Common Market (known as ‘Mercosur’). Argentina is seeking membership to the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD).[2]

Argentina has a thriving domestic wine industry and is among the world’s leading wine producers. Argentina produces mostly red wines, with Malbec, Bonarda and Cabernet Sauvignon the most widely planted varieties. White varieties are not as extensively planted, but Torrontés, Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc are the most produced in the category.

Argentina’s wine import market is relatively small, with the majority of imported wines coming across the border from Chile. Smaller quantities are imported from France, Italy and Spain. Australia is only a minor player in the Argentinean domestic market, however, wine has been identified as an export and investment opportunity by the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade.

[1] CIA Word Factbook

[2] DFAT Country Profile

Regulatory environment

The Ministerio de Salud (Ministry of Health) and the Ministerio de Agricultura, Granadería y Pesca (Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Fisheries) are responsible for administering the Argentine Food Code (Código Alimentario Argentino) (CAA), which came into force in 1971. The CAA regulates locally produced and imported food products. Under the Ministerio de Agricultura, the Instituto Nacional de Vitivinicultura (National Wine Institute) (INV), exerts control over wine and wine products during their production, manufacturing and marketing stages.

The CAA incorporates standards agreed upon within the Mercosur customs union which are influenced by standards from Codex Alimentarius; European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

The CAA is constantly being updated by joint resolutions from the Ministerio de Salud and the Ministerio de Agricultura.

Other relevant laws and regulations include the National Wine Act 1959 (Act No. 14878) and the Mercosur Wine Regulations No. 45/96.

The Dirección General de Aduanas (General Customs Directorate) which is a part of the Administración Federal de Ingresos Públicos (Federal Revenue Agency) (AFIP) is responsible for enforcing customs laws and regulations. Under Decree No. 618/1997, the Dirección General de Aduanas can assess, audit and control all operations related to international trade in goods.


Import procedures for the Argentine market

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Duties and taxes for the Argentine market

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Labelling requirements for the Argentine market

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Wine standards for the Argentine market

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This content is restricted to wine exporters and levy-payers. Some reports are available for purchase to non-levy payers/exporters.

Levy payers/exporters
Non-levy payers/exporters
Find out what you can purchase

This content is restricted to wine exporters and levy-payers. Some reports are available for purchase to non-levy payers/exporters.

Levy payers/exporters
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Non-levy payers/exporters
Find out what you can purchase