Additional Label Items and Other Terms

Wine Based Beverages / Wine Products

For export, registered geographical indications (other than Australia) and vintages cannot be included in the presentation and description of Wine Based Beverages.

Additionally, the use of a combined country of origin and product type statement on the label must very clearly indicate the true nature of the product and be easily distinguishable from the country of origin statement.    

For example:  the combined statement ‘Wine Product of Australia’ would not be acceptable, where the statement ‘Wine Product – Product of Australia’ would be. 

Pregnancy logo

The Winemakers' Federation (WFA) recommends that all Australian winemakers include a voluntary pregnancy warning on labels of wine sold in Australia. This initiative is not mandatory but is highly recommended. Further information can be found on the WFA website.

Display of awards & medals

WFA has established the Wine Industry Display of Awards Code of Practice which describes how awards may be displayed on wine products.  The code can be viewed here.

Other terms

Apera

‘Apera’ is a registered Trade Mark of Wine Australia which may only be used by approved users.

The term was developed by the wine sector to replace ‘Sherry’, which became protected upon ratification of the Agreement between Australia and the European Community on Trade in Wine.   The use of the term Apera is subject to a number of conditions including, but not limited to:

  • the term may only be used for Australian fortified wines
  • The fortified wine must comply with the taste, aroma and characteristics of an Apera Wine referred to in the Australian Wine Industry Fortified Wine Code of Practice.
  • On a label, the term must appear in the same field of vision as the producer’s distinguishing trademark
  • The term must always appear with font size equal to or less than 50 per cent of the size of the distinguishing trademark. 

To notify Wine Australia of your intent to use this term and to become an approved user, please email Rachel Triggs, General Counsel.

A copy of the current agreement can be found here.

Topaque

‘Topaque’ is a registered certification Trade Mark of Wine Australia which may only be used by approved users.  The term was developed by the wine sector to replace ‘Tokay’, which was included on the list of Registered Geographical Indications after the ratification of the Agreement between Australia and the European Community on Trade in Wine. 

The use of the term Topaque is subject to a number of conditions of use including, but not limited to:

  • the term may only be used for Australian fortified wines
  • The fortified wine must comply with the Australian Wine Industry Fortified Wine Code of Practice.

To notify Wine Australia of your intent to use this term and to become an approved user, please email Rachel Triggs – General Counsel

The term ‘Tokay’ is still able to be used up until 1 September 2020.

A copy of the current agreement can be found here.

Varietal terms

These terms are only recognised in Australia and may not be accepted in all international markets. The terms ‘Cabernets’ and ‘Pinots’ are not authorised for labelling in the European union and wine bearing it will likely be rejected.

It is important to note that a varietal term is not a grape variety name, and therefore cannot be used in conjunction with a grape variety name in a multiple claim (e.g. Cabernets Shiraz or Pinots Chardonnay).  Use of the term in this way will render it redundant and it may result in a non-compliant single varietal claim on the product.

'Cabernets'

The term ‘Cabernets’ may be used in the presentation and description of a wine in place of a varietal claim to indicate one of two types of blends - a blend of Cabernet varieties  (Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc,  Ruby Cabernet) or a blend of traditional Bordeaux* varietals (Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Merlot,  Malbec and Petit Verdot).  The context in which the term ‘Cabernets’ is being used must also be clearly defined on the label. 

 Use of the term is acceptable provided that:

  • Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc and/or Ruby Cabernet contribute at least 85% to the wines varietal composition; or
  • Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Merlot, Malbec and or Petit Verdot contribute at least 85% to the wines varietal composition.  To avoid misleading consumers, either Cabernet Sauvignon or Cabernet Franc (or both) must contribute to the blend

 *Bordeaux is a protected geographical indication and cannot be used in any context in the presentation and description of an Australian wine, even to indicate the type of blend.  

'Pinots'

The term “Pinots” may be used to present and describe a blend of two or more of the Pinot varieties - Pinot Noir, Pinot Meunier, Pinot Blanc and Pinot Gris - when these varieties comprise at least 85% of the blend.

Sparkling

It is the view of Wine Australia that, in order to comply with the food identification requirements of the Food Standards Code, wine which has not become surcharged with carbon dioxide as a result of complete or partial fermentation of contained sugars should not be labelled as ‘Sparkling Wine’. 

Wines which are carbonated by means of the addition of carbon dioxide are prohibited from export if they bare a label containing the term Sparkling or Sparkling Wine.    

Single Vineyard

The term ‘Single Vineyard’ isn’t defined in the Australian Grape and Wine Authority Act so isn’t treated in the same way as vintage, variety or GI claims. For that reason claims like ‘Single Vineyard’ would be governed by the more general Australian Consumer Law and its false and misleading provisions. Accordingly, fruit used to make a wine labelled as ‘Single Vineyard’ should be sourced from one vineyard.